what really happened in hybrid classrooms this year

What Really Happened in Hybrid Classrooms This Year

Today's episode focuses on the realities of hybrid teaching. Tennille Johnston is an award-winning science teacher in Texas who is speaking out about what really happened this school year. She bravely reflects on the real struggles, challenges, and quality of education in the school year 2020-2021. Her words reflect the honesty of a hard year of teaching – what many of us would say is the hardest years of our careers. We all need to help be realistic about a very unrealistic, unusual year as we help meet students where they are and we move forward.

what really happened in hybrid classrooms this year

Sponsor: Advancement Courses. Recently, I shared 21 Hot Topics for Teacher Professional Development for Summer 2021. If you have accreditation or learning requirements as I do, take the opportunity to look at this post. And join me as I take my courses this summer from Advancement Courses. Remember to use COOL20 to receive 20% off your course.

Listen to Tennille Johnston Share What Really Happened in Hybrid Classrooms This Year

 

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Tennille Johnston's Bio As Submitted

Tennille is a 10-year veteran Science teacher in the second-largest public school district in the state of Texas, transitioning to this career through an alternative certification program after working as a wildlife biologist for several years after graduating with a B.S. in Natural Resources/Wildlife Management from The Ohio State University.

She is a member of the Science Teacher's Association of Texas, the Texas Computer Education Association, the National Wildlife Federation, and is a Level 1 Certified Google Educator. Formerly she served as a teacher mentor in the Texas Regional Collaboratives for Excellence in Science and Math Teaching and has attended special training for inquiry-based, Maker-based, and project-based learning with the University of North Texas, Southern Methodist University, and NASA's Johnson Space Center.

She has coached teams of students participating in the National Youth Cyber Defense Competition, SeaPerch Robotics competitions, and has given presentations on coaching robotics and inquiry-based learning at the Conference for the Advancement of Science Teaching (CAST) and at Dallas ISD's STEM Expo.

Twitter: @MsJohnstonSci

You can support Ms. Johnston's classroom at http://www.donorschoose.org/Tennille.Johnston

Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

 

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Vicki Davis

Vicki Davis

Vicki Davis is a full-time classroom teacher and IT Director in Georgia, USA. She is Mom of three, wife of one, and loves talking about the wise, transformational use of technology for teaching and doing good in the world. She hosts the 10 Minute Teacher Podcast which interviews teachers around the world about remarkable classroom practices to inspire and help teachers. Vicki focuses on what unites us -- a quest for truly remarkable life-changing teaching and learning. The goal of her work is to provide actionable, encouraging, relevant ideas for teachers that are grounded in the truth and shared with love. Vicki has been teaching since 2002 and blogging since 2005. Vicki has spoken around the world to inspire and help teachers reach their students. She is passionate about helping every child find purpose, passion, and meaning in life with a lifelong commitment to the joy and responsibility of learning. If you talk to Vicki for very long, she will encourage you to "Relate to Educate" or "innovate like a turtle" or to be "a remarkable teacher." She loves to talk to teachers who love their students and are trying to do their best. Twitter is her favorite place to share and she loves to make homemade sourdough bread and cinnamon rolls and enjoys running half marathons with her sisters. You can usually find her laughing with her students or digging into a book.

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3 comments

Kassahun Aberra Endeshaw June 26, 2021 - 10:01 pm

Dear Ms. Davis,
Thank you very much for bringing the experience and insights of the educators on the impact of the hybrid system in the just-passed academic year on students and teachers alike. As an immigrant dad myself, I have also observed the challenge some teachers had on using the technology and supporting parents who had no know-how about technologies before. Specifically, for immigrant parents who do not speak English and Spanish, it was frustrating to understand the instructions and support their kids. On the other hand, I think the total lockdown could have created an opportunity for many parents to give attention to their kids’ education. So, in my opinion, I would say the impact of the pandemic on the quality of education could be mixed – creating a positive impact on those kids who have educated parents, and a negative effect on those kids whose parents are not educated.
Thanks,
Kassahun

Reply
Magarth Gooden July 19, 2021 - 3:19 pm

Ms. Johnston I do agree that hybrid teaching was a test. I can relate as my school and school community experience internet connectivity issues; and on some days students working remotely would be missing from class while students working face-to-face had anxiety due to fears of contracting the coronavirus.

I had to reassure in-class students that everything would be great. As time passed more and more students opted to work online and i started to question myself; Did I do the lesson justice as I felt lonely communicating with “black boxes or display pictures”. It lacked the feeling of in-person interaction as well as the “check-in” factor which allowed me to gauge their level of concept comprehension. I know this was hard on my grade 3 students. I am currently engaged in face-to-face summer classes to ensure that all my students are ready for grade 4. (special attention given to the students who missed plenty classes)

Reply
Magarth Gooden July 19, 2021 - 3:33 pm

I totally agree that hybrid teaching was a challenge. I can relate as my school and school community experience internet connectivity issues; and on some days students working remotely would be missing from class while students working face-to-face had anxiety due to fears of contracting the coronavirus.

I had to reassure in-class students that everything would be great. As time passed more and more students opted to work online and i started to question myself; Did I do the lesson justice as I felt lonely communicating with “black boxes or display pictures”. It lacked the feeling of in-person interaction as well as the “check-in” factor which allowed me to gauge their level of concept comprehension. I know this was hard on my grade 3 students. I am currently engaged in face-to-face summer classes to ensure that all my students are ready for grade 4. (special attention given to the students who missed plenty classes)

Reply

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Vicki Davis writes The Cool Cat Teacher Blog for classroom teachers everywhere