How to Use Fortnite in the Classroom

Mike Washburn shares insight into Fortnite

Fortnite has a physics engine in the game. Unknown to many educators, Fortnite has three modes of play. While Battle Royale is a first-person shooter, the creative mode is not. Some educators are creating private islands (for free) that their students can make Rube Goldberg machines and other creations. Today’s guest, Mike Washburn, is on the educator advisory board for Fortnite. He takes us through lessons that teachers are teaching in Fornite and also the two warnings that educators need to keep in mind when teaching with this tool.

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Sponsor: Adobe I use Adobe Premiere Rush to teach digital filmmaking in my classroom. I love it because videos and the editing projects move seamlessly between all of my student’s devices. Check out this and other Adobe resources including some from my friend Todd Nesloney on the Education Trailblazers Pinterest board that you can view at coolcatteacher.com/adobepins.

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Mike Washburn – Bio As Submitted

Mike WashburnMike is co-host of the popular education podcast OnEducation, founder of the OnPodcastMedia Network, and the Head of Curriculum & Training for Logics Academy in Canada.

In his prior role as a Computer Science teacher, he created a custom-made curriculum, using elements of game design and game-based learning, to captivate and engage his students. He has had the opportunity to share his approach to Computer Science education at ISTE (2015, 2018), FETC (2019, 2020) BIT (2014, 2019), CONNECT (2019, 2020), Schoology NEXT (2018), as well as in interviews with major newspapers (Toronto Star, 2017). Mike’s Grade 8 curriculum, which asked students to spend the entire school year designing their own video games, from proposal to pitch, graphics to BETA and release has seen him be recognized as a thought-leader in Computer Science education.

Mike is a Google Certified Educator, an Apple Teacher, a Microsoft Innovative Educator Expert, a Global Minecraft Mentor, and a member of the Prezi Educators Society. Mike is a sought after keynote speaker who challenges educators to never stop learning.

Mike challenges all educators to never stop learning and always be reaching for what’s next. He has an unshakable resolve to change the world through technology education. You can follow Mike on Twitter @misterwashburn and visit his personal site at https://www.mikewashburn.net/

Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

I love students! Best teacher blog winner * Mom * Speaker * author * HOST 10-Minute Teacher Show * @Mashable Top Teacher on Twitter * top #edtech Twitterer

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2 thoughts on “How to Use Fortnite in the Classroom

  1. Hello, I teach Computer Science and Game Design. The concern that Administration has is in game chat from others (public gamers) outside of the classroom. Can you provide information on Creative Mode and In Game Chat. I am very familiar with Game Engines, I have taught Unity for years.

    • I would reach out on Twitter to the guest in this show. I believe I included his handled in the post. That is a great question. I also learned today that the creative mode has room for 20. But if you’re in an island and it is only your students, then they would be chatting with each other only, correct? If not, it could be a problem.