Acceptable Use Should Include Acceptable Filming

Protecting teachers and students from unauthorized filming is an issue as can be seen with what happened to this fifth grade teacher at an event that many people film — the fifth grade graduation.

The video's originator filmed the teacher at graduation with close ups of her face and zooming in on her lower anatomy and set the 3 minute clip to “hot For Teacher” before it was taken down off youtube when she found out about it last week.

We should be discussing privacy concerns in amateur videos. We should learn about and be educated on what is it proper to share and what is not.

The reason we don't talk about it more, I think, is a sinking feeling in our own stomachs that perhaps we don't know what to tell kids or adults!

I always tell students that to post any digital artifact (podcast, photo, video) of a person that you must have that person's specific permission — let them see it and ask them. (Of course, what if their parents argue that they are a minor and don't have a right to decide.)

It saddens me that such things happen but I also rejoice in the new Internet and its possibilities.

Sometimes we just need to think. I find it interesting now the number of times YouTube is mentioned on the evening news each night. Has anyone ever counted?

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Vicki Davis

Vicki Davis

Vicki Davis is a full-time classroom teacher and IT Director in Georgia, USA. She is Mom of three, wife of one, and loves talking about the wise, transformational use of technology for teaching and doing good in the world. She hosts the 10 Minute Teacher Podcast which interviews teachers around the world about remarkable classroom practices to inspire and help teachers. Vicki focuses on what unites us -- a quest for truly remarkable life-changing teaching and learning. The goal of her work is to provide actionable, encouraging, relevant ideas for teachers that are grounded in the truth and shared with love. Vicki has been teaching since 2002 and blogging since 2005. Vicki has spoken around the world to inspire and help teachers reach their students. She is passionate about helping every child find purpose, passion, and meaning in life with a lifelong commitment to the joy and responsibility of learning. If you talk to Vicki for very long, she will encourage you to "Relate to Educate" or "innovate like a turtle" or to be "a remarkable teacher." She loves to talk to teachers who love their students and are trying to do their best. Twitter is her favorite place to share and she loves to make homemade sourdough bread and cinnamon rolls and enjoys running half marathons with her sisters. You can usually find her laughing with her students or digging into a book.

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7 comments

Downes August 28, 2007 - 8:25 pm

Obnoxious and rude, granted.

But I am troubled by the idea that we need to have a policy, that we need to legislate, behaviour that is obnoxious and rude.

I have never seen efforts to legislate niceness succeed, and I think I never will. Rather than defining rude behaviour as something that violates an AUP, I think it is better to simply treat it as rude behaviour, and to see it as the subject of social sanctions, and not legislative ones.

NJTechTeacher August 28, 2007 - 9:38 pm

I haven’t counted, but I was just driving home and heard yet another YouTube story on the newsradio. See story. When we were kids and made a mistake, it was small and local. Now it can easily turn into a potentially huge mistake to haunt you and cause monetary damages in the millions.

Vicki A. Davis August 28, 2007 - 8:29 pm

I don’t quite know how I feel about this one yet. I think what bothers me is the increasing idea of that everyone is going to be the next reality tv star. Just today there was an issue with one kid taking a pic of another (with permission) but the locker room door was open and someone was changing in the background.

This sort of thing is something us classroom teachers are dealing with not on a weekly but a DAILY basis. It has become the center of bullying issues and all sorts of things I couldn’t even imagine.

I just think that we need to think about things such as this and promote awareness that there are implications when one films in such a way.

There also needs to be efforts to protect teachers — we’re seeing more things such as this because kids spend all day with us. I dislike “legislation” such as the term implies, but, I think it needs to be clear with students (and their parents) that such filming is inappropriate otherwise you have no method of recourse. I think it goes past rude.

Anonymous August 30, 2007 - 9:58 pm

And what about people in, for example, Witness Protection Programs or who are trying to avoid abusive spouses and have moved to do when someone takes their picture and posts it without their permission? That could be lethal.

Bethany Smith September 1, 2007 - 8:52 pm

I run into this issue all the time as webmaster for my school. Teachers and administrators are constantly wanting to put more pictures up of our students on the site. As much as I love adding graphic elements, I constantly have to remind them of the laws that govern pictures and video. Any pictures or video taken in a private setting (including a classroom), need permission to be published in a public form – like the internet. I am trying to “train” my faculty into getting permission while they are taking pictures. The university helped us create a form for this purpose (which can be viewed at http://ced.ncsu.edu/ltrc/studio/)and it has worked wonderfully (when it is being used!)

Anonymous September 13, 2007 - 10:51 pm

Blog Response # 2

Title of post: Acceptable Use Should Include Acceptable Filming

URL: http://coolcatteacher.blogspot.com/

Vicki A. Davis writes “We should be discussing privacy concerns in amateur videos. We should learn about and be educated on what is it proper to share and what is not.”

My Response: In this day and age of readily available technology, I agree that adolescents need to be taught a clear definition of what is acceptable and what is a violation of privacy. It is both sad and scary what happened to the teacher at the graduation in North Carolina. It is also scary that at any time this could happen to anyone without them even knowing. It was a good choice for U-Tube to pull the video quickly.

Perhaps one way this problem might partially be solved is if high school technology classes spent more time going over privacy concerns with students.

crowsey September 13, 2007 - 10:54 pm

In this day and age of readily available technology, I agree that adolescents need to be taught a clear definition of what is acceptable and what is a violation of privacy. It is both sad and scary what happened to the teacher at the graduation in North Carolina. It is also scary that at any time this could happen to anyone without them even knowing. It was a good choice for U-Tube to pull the video quickly.

Perhaps one way this problem might partially be solved is if high school technology classes spent more time going over privacy concerns with students.

Comments are closed.

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